Philippe Starck’s MyWorld Lounge System for Cassina

"We live in a schizophrenic society. Let’s assume that. MyWorld is a cocoon, a nest, a world where we can be egocentric and comfortably commune with our own shadow or collect some snatches of news from the world, that is said to be real”.

Featuring a built in power-system, a USB charger and a Duracell power mat to wirelessly charge your mobile devices, Starck combines clean aesthetics with contemporary practicality, The result is a satisfyingly compact and appealing system that can be arranged in a variety of combinations with accessories like box-cupboards. 

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Café Kitsuné opens in Paris

Founders of international clothing brand Maison Kitsuné, Gildas Loaëc and Masaya Kuroki, open up a new café in the French capital following the success of Café Kitsuné Tokyo. Nestled in the city’s epicentre near Palais Royal, the intimate coffee bar shall serve up the caffeinated delights of Minas Gerais coffee from Brazil and roasted in London, thus acquiring “notes of chocolate and toasted hazelnut, a light hint of ripe cherry, and a syrupy sweet finish”. Also featuring on the menu are cold-pressed juices from Bob’s and gluten free pastries and cakes from Noglu.

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Ostgut Ton Showcase with Ben Klock, Marcel Fengler & Boris at Village Underground, London

Live review by Tish Sanghera

Sunday March 16th saw London hit 20 degrees by noon. The parks were full of cider drinking, illegal barbecuing and the sudden arrival of the capital’s flock of Mr Whippy vans on early release from hibernation. Was I out there flooding my pasty body with this rare pre-springtime solar Vitamin D? Heck no. Instead I joined my fellow comrades, decked out in our Normcore finest, for all out war as Shoreditch’s Village Underground was take over with the best from Berlin.

 Arriving at 2pm, this Sunday was devoted to 12 hours of the satanic machinations of techno label Ostgut Ton’s big-hitters. Veteran Boris eased us into this day of sacrilegious ecstasy with his signature genre bending track mixes from house to minimal and with just a hint of disco interlaced throughout. Being the opening DJ is never an enviable task, but Boris managed to establish a playful party atmosphere on this Sunday afternoon, seeing nothing but smiling faces as I looked around at my fellow boppers. By the time Marcel Fengler took to the podium, the cavernous space (formerly a Victorian viaduct) was filled with a community of techno heads prepped to experience the highs of his well-established and refined Berlin style. Starting his set with an ambient sound, the vibe mellowed as the crowd stopped to appreciate the complexity of the craft before them, his four hour set peaking an hour before the end as he finished with the crowd pleasing classic Frantic.

Then arrived the main event. The chief. The suzerain. The techno tsar that is Ben Klock. With his square jaw, moody stare and more than slight resemblance to Woody Harrelson, it’s hard to blame a girly fan like myself for the next four hours that I spent transfixed to my arduously won dead-centre spot. Spinning mainly house to begin with, Klock’s legions hurled themselves with adoring vigour to his familiar remixes. But then came the good stuff, the minimal musings that the Berghain resident is continually acclaimed for. We didn’t care that by now we were beyond sweaty, that the floor was littered with eagerly downed water bottles or that the front rows of relentless ravers had now reached violent levels of pulsation - Klock was on form. The following hours were filled with the a kind of magic transported from Berlin’s darkest dance floors, enveloping both spectator and performer in a cloud of symbiotic appreciation. Tweeting the next morning that The good thing about DJing: You can put all the love, the anger, the pain and loss into it and leave it on the dance floor. Thank you people at Village Underground for taking that journey with me last night”, simply confirmed that my respect for this genre defining DJ was not misdirected.  Yes, a techno set when performed at its best is nothing other than a transportative experience. It’s about sharing in the emotions the sound invokes in the artist, reaching out to the audience in a raw and visceral way, to create a unique, fleeting, four-hour bond based on the universal appreciation of the force of rhythm and beat, felt on an almost elemental level. This was Ostgut Ton’s first Sunday showcase in London, and long may it reign.

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Abandoned Cinema found in Sinai Desert

Discovered by Estonian photographer Kuako Kikkas deep in the Egyptian Sinai desert, no film has ever been shown here and nor does one ever seem likely to.

Apparently commissioned at the turn of the millennium by an unidentified French pot-head (Kikkas’ description), the cinema was built as an ambitious and achingly romantic project by a man with an abundance of cash to spare. The results are truly astonishingly (even if they do seem to conjure up the set of the 70s Planet of the Apes tv series) and equally eery. Perfectly aligned fold-away seats remain untouched, faded to a palette of copper, muted browns and a hint of rusty iron. 

On opening night, the generator is said to have mysteriously cut out cutting the flamboyant frenchie’s party short. It seems that local Egyptians objected to the project, apparently not quite sharing the same joie de vivre for stoner slob out sessions in front of the big screen.

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The Gentlewoman Issue 9 feat. Vivienne Westwood

Featuring the iconic British designer as the cover-star, bi-annual women’s life style magazine The Gentlewoman have just released their ninth issue. Containing “28 exceptional international women of with, brilliance and beauty”, also featured are Opening Ceremony co-founder Carole Lim, British stylist Camilla Nickerson, Scottish tennis powerhouse and super-mom Judy Murray, Welsh folk singer Cate Le Bon and Italian fashion dynamo Verde Visconti, all alongside a glorious presentation of summer fashions with in an extensive glossy section.

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French Fries - Kepler
Album review by Tish Sanghera
 Oh boy has the young garçon grown up. Gone are the days it seems of Valentino Mora’s, a.k.a French Fries, booming beats and mainstream rhymes that saw his early establishment as hegemonic overlord of the Paris club scene. With early track titles such as ‘Yo Vogue’ and ‘Champagne’, his previous work was undoubtedly aimed at the electro ballers and lithe young things of the capital’s dance floors, manipulating catchy hip-hop samples and gyrating riddums – he was all about dat bass.
Last month however saw the young DJ and co-founder of ClekClekBoom Recordings release his very first 13 track EP and with titles like Program, Forward Action and This Kind of Setup there is no doubt that the album should be taken as the result of some sort of sonic rumspringa, a declaration of his now more refined, directional and downright mature techno sound. Stripping back his more gregarious beat production of yesteryear, French Fries excels in his minimal undertakings. The simply synth-laced rhythm of Explore evokes the sonic abyss of space exploration, as do the futuristic chimes of K62 (featuring long time buddy and collaboration partner Bambanou), with both tracks conjuring up images of astronomical fascination and boyish experimentation. Staying loyal to his House roots, Reality System, perfectly highlights the producer’s graduation to the parameters of bona fide techno; although I admit it is more than slightly repetitive for its 5 minute duration, it’s this track that showcases the album’s project to the full – a kind of electronic space odyssey from what I can gather… Kepler then, apparently named after a NASA vessel currently in orbit, seems to be a rather appropriate name for this project, and also for an artist who appears to pick out names with a stroke of the ‘I’m Feeling Lucky’ Google button.

For more follow BOOK OF T on tumblr
 
 
 

French Fries - Kepler

Album review by Tish Sanghera

 Oh boy has the young garçon grown up. Gone are the days it seems of Valentino Mora’s, a.k.a French Fries, booming beats and mainstream rhymes that saw his early establishment as hegemonic overlord of the Paris club scene. With early track titles such as ‘Yo Vogue’ and ‘Champagne’, his previous work was undoubtedly aimed at the electro ballers and lithe young things of the capital’s dance floors, manipulating catchy hip-hop samples and gyrating riddums – he was all about dat bass.

Last month however saw the young DJ and co-founder of ClekClekBoom Recordings release his very first 13 track EP and with titles like Program, Forward Action and This Kind of Setup there is no doubt that the album should be taken as the result of some sort of sonic rumspringa, a declaration of his now more refined, directional and downright mature techno sound. Stripping back his more gregarious beat production of yesteryear, French Fries excels in his minimal undertakings. The simply synth-laced rhythm of Explore evokes the sonic abyss of space exploration, as do the futuristic chimes of K62 (featuring long time buddy and collaboration partner Bambanou), with both tracks conjuring up images of astronomical fascination and boyish experimentation. Staying loyal to his House roots, Reality System, perfectly highlights the producer’s graduation to the parameters of bona fide techno; although I admit it is more than slightly repetitive for its 5 minute duration, it’s this track that showcases the album’s project to the full – a kind of electronic space odyssey from what I can gather… Kepler then, apparently named after a NASA vessel currently in orbit, seems to be a rather appropriate name for this project, and also for an artist who appears to pick out names with a stroke of the ‘I’m Feeling Lucky’ Google button.

For more follow BOOK OF T on tumblr

 

 

 

Andrew Berman Architect - Secluded Writing Studio

Andrew Berman Architect has completed a secluded writing studio and library of a historian client. Approached by foot through a small wooded area, the contemporary lib ray sits by itself in an open field with a large window looking into the nearby tree canopy and through to a small tidal stream. The outside of the eye-catching building is clad entirely in copper, which shifts in colour depending on the light of day and viewing angle. “The copper can appear reflective and bright, as well as matte and dark,” according to the architect. “The velvety browns and violets will slowly give way to green.”

Meanwhile, the inside is painted white and features minimalist furnishings made from Douglas fir,  making it the perfect space for relaxation and deep thought.

For more great finds follow BOOK OF T on tumblr.  

 

'Reporter' App

Nicholas Felton, the brains behind Facebook’s ‘timeline’ concept, serves up this novel app capable of measuring your entire life and summing it up in a range of aesthetically pleasing graphs. ‘Reporter’, works as a survey tool, notifying the user to answer a series of questions at randomized times during the day. Aiming for efficiency, the app is designed to ask and record your answers in less than 10 seconds, working to integrate seamlessly into your life.

Originally created as a private app for Felton, the info graphic designer used the technology to track the last two years of life, resulting in the Felton Report, then released each year’s data as limited-edition graphic prints for sale.

Purchase the app and start your own report here

For more great finds follow BOOK OF T on tumblr.

The London Underground Coffee Circuit
Halle freaking lujah. Public transport just become a whole lot more amenable. Next time you’re gasping for a shot of the good stuff, having just emerged from the sweaty underbelly of London town, just take a nosy at this incredibly useful map drawn up by Chris Ward. Perfect.
Click here for similar life-saving cartography when next in NYC.
For more great finds follow BOOK OF T on tumblr.

The London Underground Coffee Circuit

Halle freaking lujah. Public transport just become a whole lot more amenable. Next time you’re gasping for a shot of the good stuff, having just emerged from the sweaty underbelly of London town, just take a nosy at this incredibly useful map drawn up by Chris Ward. Perfect.

Click here for similar life-saving cartography when next in NYC.

For more great finds follow BOOK OF T on tumblr.

Four Tet - Beautiful Rewind

Album review by Tish Sanghera

I have to admit I’ve somewhat neglected poor old Kieran Hebden. Denying him my full audio attention, always just quite happy to nod along and agree with general popular consensus that his electronic epigraphs are among the best of the moment, aware only of his collaborative work with Burial and their widely acclaimed tracks ‘Moth’ and ‘Wolf Club’.

It was by accident then that I found myself one weekday evening (in the midst of one of those YouTube- procrastination black-holes you can only seem to get yourself in when you have the most urgent of tasks staring up at you) streaming Four Tet’s seventh album Beautiful Rewind, start to finish, un-interrupted, with no regrets and paralysed with pleasure. Not sure what I was expecting, and truthfully not really expecting much, this was the kind of startling surprise comparable only to that of discovering your phone survived a 3 hour long soak at 90 degrees in the washing machine and still works. A purely winning situation. This dense electronica is injected with a strong vein of jungle beats, incorporating the amusing rhythms of rave culture and its playful attitude to often random and absurd sampling.

Opening track Gong is chaotic and disjointed, a wondrous entrance into the album’s clearly targeted destination, the dancehall. The album’s flagship track is undoubtedly Kool Fm, a nod to pirate radio and the subversive influences of 90s garage whose nostalgic beats lend a distorted pulse to the energy of the whole album. Personal highlights include Parallel Jalebi and Ba Teaches Yoga, both containing haunting female vocals and the kind of hypnotic chopter beats that leave you circulating on your saddeningly static plastic office chair. Special mention goes to Your Body Feels, the heady closing track with powers of transportation into such extreme reverie that I opened my eyes to genuine disbelief that I wasn’t in fact reclining on paisley clad scatter cushions in a fin-de-siècle Peking opium den. In short, a great album that travels through decades, traverses genre and explores sensation – a perfect hit of sonic bliss. 

 

For more follow BOOK OF T on tumblr.

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